>  > All About Mushrooms
All About Mushrooms

All About Mushrooms

Wednesday, 22nd February 2017

More than just a fungus.
The Ancient Greeks used them to provide strength for battle. The Romans called them the ‘food of the gods’. Traditional Chinese medicine has used them for thousands of years for their many health benefits.
We looked back at the history and traditional use of some of our favorite mushrooms to help you find your favorite fungi!
 
Chaga Mushroom – Grown on Birch trees in Northern Europe and Russia, this mushroom has an unappetizing appearance and is often mistaken for burnt wood. It was traditionally used in folk medicines to treat viral and bacterial infections.
 
 
Maitake Mushroom – Meaning ‘dancing mushroom’ in Japanese this delicious mushroom is said to ‘make one feel happy, vigorous and look younger’. Feeding on the dead roots of trees and sometimes growing up to three stone in weight these mushrooms are not only tasty but have a wide variety of health benefits.
 
 
Cordyceps Mushroom - This rare mushroom is traditionally found growing on the larvae of moths in extreme environments such as the high Tibetan plateau. Used in traditional Chinese medicine to boost the immune system and provide energy and stamina.
 
 
Reishi Mushroom – Also called the ‘10,000 Year Mushroom’ due to it’s many health benefits, Resishi is probably the most widely known medicinal mushroom. Traditionally associated with the Taoist quest for immortality it’s anti-inflammatory, immune boosting and anti-histamine activity is said to help with allergies and hayfever.
 
 
Lions Mane Mushroom – Also referred as the ‘Hedgehog Mushroom’ or the ‘Bearded Tooth Fungus’. Used in traditional Chinese medicine since 2000 BC to help with mental clarity amongst other things.
 
 
Shitake Mushroom – Traditionally used in Folk medicine but most commonly used as a culinary mushroom, the Shitake has a wide range of benefits. With all eight essential amino acids and a good blend of vitamins and minerals, it’s a great substitute for soybeans, milk, meat and eggs. A natural source of lovastatin also makes it great for digestive health.
 



 

Written By

Leave your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked*

(Leave blank to show as anonymous)
(Required, this will not display)